Dan Coker's Match Preview

Match Preview: West Ham v Tottenham

Blast from the past

Today’s focus sees us travel back over 115 years, to the 14th February 1903 – this particular Valentine’s Day saw psychoanalyst Carl Jung marry Emma Rauschenbach, the elder daughter of a wealthy industrialist. West Ham United, meanwhile, secured a 1-0 victory over Tottenham Hotspur in front of 8,000 at the Memorial Grounds.

The winning goal was scored by inside-forward James Wallace (pictured). Wallace made his West Ham debut at inside-right in a 1-0 FA Cup third qualifying round victory at Leyton on 2nd November 1901; his only other appearance that season was a 3-0 defeat at Reading three weeks later. He had better luck in 1902/03 when he switched to the inside-left berth against Wellingborough in January 1903 and kept the position for the remainder of that campaign, scoring his first two goals for the Irons in his next two games, a 1-1 draw at Bristol Rovers and 3-2 home win over Northampton. The strike in this featured match against Tottenham was his third and final goal for the club in the eighth of his 18 Hammers appearances. He joined Luton with outside-left Billy Barnes in the summer of 1904.

Syd King’s Hammers would end the 1902/03 Southern League First Division season in tenth position, while Tottenham would finish fourth. Southampton topped the division, The Wednesday won the First Division title and Bury won the FA Cup. Bill Grassam topped the Hammers’ scoring charts that season, with 19 goals from 30 matches.

West Ham United: Fred Griffiths, Aubrey Fair, James Dow, James Bigden, Bill Yenson, Joe Blythe, John Campbell, Bill Grassam, Bill Davidson, James Wallace, Billy Barnes.

Club Connections

A large group of players have turned out for Tottenham Hotspur and West Ham United. Divided here by position, they include:

Goalkeepers: Bill Kaine, Charlie Ambler, Tony Parks, Fred Griffiths.

Defenders: Calum Davenport, Paul Konchesky, Mark Bowen, Mauricio Tarrico, Steve Walford, Simon Webster, Chris Hughton, Percy Mapley, Fred Milnes, Mitchell Thomas, Neil Ruddock.

Midfielders: Paul Allen, Scott Parker, Michael Carrick, Jimmy Neighbour, Ilie Dumitrescu, Matthew Etherington, Mark Robson, David Bentley, Charlie Whitchurch, Chris Carrick, Martin Peters, John Smith, John Moncur.

Strikers: Mido, Frederic Kanoute, Almer Hall, Peter Kyle, Sergei Rebrov, Kenny McKay, George Foreman, Dave Dunmore, Teddy Sheringham, Les Bennett, Jermain Defoe, Bill Joyce, Robbie Keane, Fred Massey, Jimmy Reid, Clive Allen, Bobby Zamora, Les Ferdinand, Jimmy Greaves, Harry Bradshaw.

Jack Tresadern played for West Ham and managed Tottenham, while Trevor Hartley also played for the Hammers and managed Spurs on a caretaker basis. Alan Pardew played for Tottenham and managed the Hammers, while Harry Redknapp played for the Hammers and managed both clubs.

Today’s focus is on a current Hammer who started his career at Tottenham Hotspur. Ryan Fredericks was born in Hammersmith on 10th October 1992. He came through Tottenham’s Academy and was named on the bench for the senior side’s 3-1 FA Cup fourth round replay victory over Leeds at Elland Road in February 2010. Injury would keep him out for almost a year but he would make a senior debut for Tottenham under Harry Redknapp in their goalless draw with Hearts in the UEFA Europa League Play-Offs in August 2011, before featuring twice in the Group Stage. He played nine minutes of a 0-0 draw at PAOK Salonika and the full match away to Rubin Kazan which ended in a 1-0 defeat. Fredericks also made one appearance for England Under-19s but found his path blocked by Nathaniel Clyne and Andre Wisdom at Under-21 level. He is eligible to represent Guyana.

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Andre Villas-Boas did not give Fredericks any game time in 2012/13, opting to loan him to Brentford instead. Fredericks turned 20 while with the League One side and made his Football League debut for the Griffin Park club, playing three minutes of a goalless draw at Bury in August 2012. Fredericks was finally handed a start back at Tottenham by Villas-Boas in a Europa League Group Stage match against Anzhi Makhachkala in December 2013, but it would prove to be the Portuguese manager’s penultimate match in charge of Spurs. Fredericks won a penalty in the 4-1 victory at White Hart Lane. Tim Sherwood loaned Fredericks to Millwall and the right-back scored his first senor goal on his debut for the Lions in a 1-0 win over Ipswich at The Den.

New Tottenham manager Mauricio Pochettino sent Fredericks on a season-long loan to Middlesbrough for the 2014/15 campaign. Pochettino allowed Fredericks to leave the club permanently in the summer of 2015, with the 22-year-old signing for Steve Cotterill’s Bristol City. He made five appearances for his new club before requesting a move for personal reasons. He returned to London just 26 days after signing for Bristol City, joining fellow Championship side Fulham – he made 114 goalless appearances for Fulham, registering 15 assists and 29 yellow cards.

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Fredericks signed for Manuel Pellegrini’s West Ham on a free transfer in June of this year. He made his Hammers debut in a 4-0 defeat at Liverpool on 12th August this year. Now 26, he has made four appearances to date for West Ham, scoring one goal in the 8-0 League Cup third round win over Macclesfield on 26th September 2018.

Referee

The referee on Saturday will be Martin Atkinson. 2018/19 is Atkinson’s 14th as a Premier League referee. Since West Ham United achieved promotion back to the top flight in 2012 Atkinson has refereed 22 of our league matches, officiating in ten wins for the Hammers, three draws and nine defeats. Atkinson is pictured refereeing this fixture in 2010, when the Irons won 1-0 courtesy of a Frederic Piquionne header.

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His Hammers appointments last season were our 1-1 home draws with Leicester and Bournemouth in November and January respectively, our 4-1 defeat at Swansea in March, our 3-0 home defeat to Brighton last October and our 4-0 opening weekend defeat at Manchester United in August 2017. His most recent Irons match was our 3-1 win over Everton last month.

Possible line-ups

West Ham United will be without Winston Reid, Carlos Sanchez, Jack Wilshere, Manuel Lanzini and Andy Carroll. Arthur Masuaku, Robert Snodgrass and Chicharito should all be available. The Hammers have won five of the last 22 Premier League games against Tottenham.

Tottenham Hotspur are without Jan Vertonghen, Danny Rose, Dele Alli and Vincent Janssen but Victor Wanyama, Mousa Dembele and Christian Eriksen should be available. There have been four red cards in the last five encounters between these two sides in east London. Harry Kane has seven goals in his last seven league games against West Ham.

Possible West Ham United XI: Fabianski; Zabaleta, Balbuena, Diop, Cresswell; Rice, Noble, Obiang; Yarmolenko, Arnautovic, Anderson.

Possible Tottenham Hotspur XI: Lloris; Trippier, Alderweireld, Sanchez, Davies; Dier, Wanyama; Lucas Moura, Eriksen, Son; Kane.

Enjoy the game – Up The Hammers!


Dan Coker's Match Preview

Crossed Hammers & Three Lions: Frank Lampard Senior

Welcome to the latest in a series of articles designed for international matches – a look back at former Hammers players who wore the Three Lions of England.

Today, as England prepare to face Spain in Sevilla, we look back at a true legend of West Ham United Football Club – Frank Lampard Senior. Frank was born in East Ham on 20th September 1948 – his father, also Frank, passed away in 1953 at the age of 33 when young Frank was only five years old. He joined West Ham’s Academy in 1964 and, aged 19, made his first team debut on 18th November 1967 in a 3-2 home defeat to Manchester City in front of 25,495. He made 22 appearances in the 1967/68 season, quickly establishing himself in his preferred left-back position but disaster struck when he broke his leg in a 2-1 win at Sheffield United on 27th April 1968. He would not play again for over a year, making his comeback in a 1-1 draw at Maine Road against Manchester City on 30th April 1969 – it was his only appearance in the 1968/69 campaign.

Frank scored his first goal for the club in a 4-2 home win over Halifax in a League Cup second round tie on 3rd September 1969 and made 33 appearances in 1969/70, playing alongside the likes of Bobby Moore, Martin Peters and Sir Geoff Hurst as West Ham finished 17th in the First Division. Frank made 44 appearances in 1970/71, scoring his first league goal for the Hammers in a 2-1 defeat at Chelsea on 19th December 1970. He made 53 appearances in 1971/72, scoring one goal in a thrilling 3-3 home draw with Derby on 22nd January 1972.

A goalless 1972/73 followed, with Frank making 42 appearances as the Hammers finished in sixth place in the First Division – having represented England Under-23s on four occasions, the 24-year-old Frank also made his England debut under Sir Alf Ramsey in a 1-1 draw against Yugoslavia at Wembley on 11th October 1972. Hard as nails and fierce in the tackle, Frank was also comfortable on the ball and possessed a ferocious shot.

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Two goals in 47 appearances in 1973/74 would follow, with strikes coming in a 4-2 win at Chelsea on Boxing Day 1973 and a wonderful, curling drive into the top corner in a 2-2 home draw with Liverpool on 27th April 1974. Ron Greenwood later stated that Frank had intimated that he would like to leave West Ham during this season – in doing so, he lost out on the captaincy when Bobby Moore left the club in March 1974, with Billy Bonds instead named as Moore’s replacement.

Frank would win the FA Cup with the Hammers in 1975, scoring in a 2-1 third round win at Southampton on 4th January 1975 to set the Irons on their way to the Final against Fulham at Wembley. 1974/75 would also be Frank’s best goalscoring season in claret and blue, with his other four goals coming in a 2-0 home win over Luton, a 2-1 defeat at Tottenham, a 1-0 win at Carlisle and a 5-2 home win over Wolves. He would score four goals the following campaign – the winner in a 1-0 home victory over Manchester City, one in a 3-3 draw at Leicester, another in a 5-1 win at Birmingham and a typical thumping strike from distance in a 3-1 European Cup Winners’ Cup quarter-final second leg win over Dutch side Den Haag at the Boleyn Ground. Lampard’s short backpass to goalkeeper Mervyn Day sadly contributed to the Hammers’ 4-2 defeat in the Final to Anderlecht. When his studs caught in the turf, leading to the short backpass, Frank also sustained a stomach injury which saw him flown home immediately after the game for an emergency operation. Frank had made 54 appearances in both 1974/75 and 1975/76.

Despite talk of a move to Norwich, Frank’s only goal in his 39 games in 1976/77 was a crucial one, coming in a 4-2 home win over Manchester United on 16th May 1977 which secured the Hammers’ top-flight survival. The reprieve would not last long with the club relegated the following season, Frank failing to get on the scoresheet in his 44 matches. He would score three goals in 31 appearances in his first campaign in the second tier, in a 3-1 home win over Preston, a 4-3 defeat at Wrexham and a 5-0 home win over Newcastle.

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Arguably Frank’s finest moment in a West Ham shirt arrived in the 1980 FA Cup semi-final replay against Everton. With the match locked at 1-1, Trevor Brooking’s right-wing cross was nodded down by David Cross for Lampard, popping up out of nowhere to send a diving header into the corner and send the Hammers to Wembley for a Final meeting with Arsenal, which of course the Irons would go on to win. Frank’s celebratory dance of delight round the Elland Road corner flag has lived long in the memories of many West Ham United supporters. It was his only goal from his 49 appearances in 1979/80 – and what a time to score it! On top of his second FA Cup Final triumph, the 31-year-old Frank won further reward from his former West Ham manager Ron Greenwood with his second and final England cap on 31st May 1980, in a 2-1 win in Sydney against Australia.

Frank made 55 appearances as the Hammers secured promotion back to the top flight in 1981, scoring one goal in a 5-0 win over Preston on 31st January 1981. He made 35 appearances to help the Hammers consolidate their First Division status in the 1981/82 campaign. 42 appearances followed in 1982/83, along with two goals, the first coming in a 1-1 draw with Ipswich at Upton Park. Frank was sent off in a 3-1 defeat at Brighton on 23rd October 1982. His second goal of the season also transpired to be his last for the club; it came in a 1-1 home draw with Southampton on 26th February 1983 – on a personal note, this was the first Hammers goal of my life (I had been born three weeks earlier).

Frank would play 24 matches in 1983/84 and only one in 1984/85 – his final game for West Ham came in a 3-0 home defeat to Liverpool on 20th May 1985, 13 months after his previous match. Frank Lampard Senior had scored 22 goals for the club and made 670 appearances – he remains second only to the great Billy Bonds in the Hammers’ all-time appearance chart. My video below is a compilation of ten of Frank’s 22 goals for West Ham United.

The 36-year-old Frank was granted a free transfer and moved to Third Division Southend for the 1985/86 season. Bobby Moore was the Shrimpers’ manager at the time, with fellow former Hammers Kevin Lock and Harry Cripps on the playing and coaching staff respectively. Frank retired as a player at the same time Moore resigned as manager.

Despite pursuing a number of business ventures outside the game, Frank continued to work for West Ham in a part-time scouting and coaching capacity before being appointed assistant to his brother-in-law, Harry Redknapp, in August 1994. He saw his son, Frank Junior, score 38 goals in 187 appearances for the club, before Frank Senior departed alongside Redknapp in May 2001. Frank Junior won the same number of caps (two) while with the Hammers as Frank Senior had – Frank Junior went on to win 106 caps before his international career came to a close in 2014.

Frank Senior was married to Patricia before her death on 24th April 2008 following complications from pneumonia. Frank and Pat had three children, Natalie, Claire and the aforementioned Frank Junior. Pat’s twin sister is Sandra Redknapp, wife of Harry. Frank Senior is also uncle to former England, Liverpool, Tottenham and Southampton midfielder Jamie Redknapp.

Frank was appointed as a Football Consultant to Watford manager Brendan Rodgers in November 2008 and followed Rodgers to Reading in June 2009 to take up a similar role at the Madejski Stadium. Frank left Reading when Rodgers departed by mutual consent in December 2009. Frank Lampard Senior turned 70 just over three weeks ago.

Spain v England

England face Spain this evening in a Nations League match – it will be the 27th meeting between the two nations. The pair met in Group B of the 1980 European Championships, with England winning 2-1 in Napoli on 18th June 1980. Don McLean was number one with ‘Crying’, The Empire Strikes Back was in UK cinemas and, the day before, Secretary of State for Defence Francis Pym had revealed to the House of Commons that US nuclear cruise missiles would be located at RAF Greenham Common in Berkshire and the disused RAF Molesworth base in Cambridgeshire.

Ron Greenwood’s England took the lead after 18 minutes courtesy of 31-year-old West Ham United legend Trevor Brooking, who thumped home from close range. It was the third of his five England goals, in the 39th of his 47 caps.

Spain equalised three minutes into the second half through a penalty scored by Athletic Bilbao’s Dani. Ray Clemence later saved a penalty before 24-year-old Cologne striker Tony Woodcock secured a 2-1 win for England in the 68th minute. The Three Lions had previously drawn with Belgium and been beaten by hosts Italy, meaning this win over Spain was not enough to reach the knockout stage. West Germany went on to win the tournament.

England: Ray Clemence (Liverpool), Viv Anderson (Nottingham Forest), Phil Thompson (Liverpool), Dave Watson (Southampton), Mick Mills (Ipswich), Glenn Hoddle (Tottenham), Ray Wilkins (Man Utd), Terry McDermott (Liverpool), Trevor Brooking (West Ham), Kevin Keegan (captain, Hamburg), Tony Woodcock (Cologne).

Subs: Paul Mariner (Ipswich) for Hoddle; Trevor Cherry (Leeds) for Anderson.

Spain: Luis Arconada (Real Sociedad), Jose Ramon Alexanko (Athletic Bilbao), Francisco Javier Uria (Sporting Gijon), Rafael Gordillo (Real Betis), Antonio Olmo (Barcelona), Cundi (Sporting Gijon), Julio Cardenosa (Real Betis), Jesus Zamora (Real Sociedad), Juanito (Real Madrid), Enrique Saura (Valencia), Santillana (captain, Real Madrid).

Subs: Francisco Jose Carrasco (Barcelona) for Cardenosa; Dani (Athletic Bilbao) for Saura.

The previous articles in the series are:

Jack Tresadern
Ken Brown
Johnny ‘Budgie’ Byrne
Bobby Moore
Martin Peters
Sir Trevor Brooking
Alan Devonshire
Alvin Martin
Paul Goddard
Stuart Pearce
Frank Lampard Junior
Joe Cole
David James
Robert Green


Dan Coker's Match Preview

West Ham's Spanish Connections: Part Two

With England’s upcoming Nations League match against Spain coming up on Monday, here’s Part Two of a look back at the Hammers’ Spanish contingent.

Part One can be viewed here.

Diego Tristan

Diego Tristan was born on 5th January 1976 in La Algaba, Sevilla, Spain and began his career with the B teams at Real Betis and Mallorca between 1995 and 1999 before progressing to Mallorca’s first team, finishing his first La Liga campaign with 18 goals from 35 matches. He moved to Deportivo La Coruna in 2000, representing the club in the Champions League and winning the Supercopa de Espana in 2000 and the Copa del Rey in 2002.

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Tristan made his international debut for Spain a year later at the age of 25, scoring in his first appearance in a 4-1 World Cup qualifying win over Bosnia and Herzegovina in Oviedo. He was part of the Spain squad at the 2002 World Cup – he won 15 caps for his country, scoring four goals, with his last appearance being a 3-0 friendly win in Portugal in September 2003.

Tristan was released in the summer of 2006 alongside Lionel Scaloni, who had just completed a loan move at West Ham. Tristan returned to Mallorca but was released midway through the 2006/07 season having not scored a goal in his second spell with the club. He moved to Italy in the summer of 2007, signing for Serie A side Livorno but scored only once as the club were relegated to Serie B.

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Following a two-week trial, free agent Tristan signed for Gianfranco Zola’s West Ham United in October 2008. The 32-year-old striker made his debut as a substitute in a 2-0 home defeat to Tottenham on 8th December 2008 and scored his first goal for the Hammers on 28th December 2008, the winner in a 2-1 home victory over Stoke. Employed mainly from the bench, Tristan had to wait until his ninth appearance to make his first start in claret and blue, this coming in the 1-1 draw at Blackburn in March 2009. He scored a late equaliser in a 1-1 draw at Aston Villa on 18th April 2009, diverting Kieron Dyer’s wayward shot into the net with his head. His final goal for the Hammers was a sublime free-kick in a 1-0 win at Stoke on 2nd May 2009, with his final appearance for the club coming as a substitute in the 2-1 home win over Middlesbrough on the final day of the 2008/09 season. Diego Tristan made 17 appearances for the Hammers, scoring three goals, two of which can be seen in my video below.

Tristan returned to Spain in the summer of 2009, signing for Cadiz in the second tier – this marked a return to his native Andalusia after 14 years. He scored eight goals in 30 appearances but the club were relegated at the end of the 2009/10 campaign. Tristan retired from football at the age of 34. Now 42, Tristan scored 193 goals in 513 appearances in domestic football in Spain, Italy and England.

Alvaro Arbeloa

Alvaro Arbeloa was born on 17th January 1983 in Salamanca, Spain. He progressed from Real Madrid’s C team in 2002 to their B team (Castilla) in 2003 before making a couple of appearances for the first team in 2004/05. He joined Deportivo La Coruna in the summer of 2006 but moved to Liverpool in January 2007. Mainly operating at right-back but also able to fill in on the left, Arbeloa was a Champions League runner-up with the Reds in 2007 and made his debut for Spain in 2008; he was in the winning Spain squad for the 2008 European Championships.

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Arbeloa returned to Real Madrid in the summer of 2009 and won the World Cup with Spain in 2010. He won his second European Championships with his country in 2012 and won 56 caps for his country in total, without scoring. He also won the Champions League in 2014 and 2016, La Liga in 2012, the Copa del Rey in 2011 and 2014, the Supercopa de Espana in 2012, the FIFA Club World Cup in 2014 and the UEFA Super Cup in 2014.

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Having been released by Real Madrid, the 33-year-old Arbeloa signed for West Ham United on a free transfer. Arbeloa made four appearances for the Hammers, making his debut in a 1-0 League Cup third round win over Accrington Stanley on 21st September 2016. He started the 3-0 home defeat to Southampton four days later He also made substitute appearances in a 1-1 home draw with Middlesbrough and in his final game, a 5-1 home defeat to Arsenal on 3rd December 2016. Now 35, Arbeloa retired in the summer of 2017.

Toni Martinez

Toni Martinez was born on 30th June 1997 in Barrio del Progreso, Murcia, Spain and began his career with hometown outfit Murcia before moving to Valencia. He played for Valencia’s B team in the Spanish third tier, scoring two goals in 16 games, before signing for West Ham for a fee of £2.4m in July 2016. He had a spell on loan at League One Oxford, scoring three goals in 17 games. He also helped West Ham’s Under-23 side earn promotion to the top tier of the Premier League 2 competition.

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The 20-year-old Martinez made his Hammers first team debut as a substitute in a 0-0 FA Cup third round draw at Shrewsbury on 7th January 2018. The centre-forward helped the Irons to a 1-0 win in the replay, setting up Reece Burke’s winner. His third and most recent West Ham appearance came in the 2-0 FA Cup fourth round defeat at Wigan on 27th January this year.

Martinez joined Spanish second tier side Real Valladolid on loan for the second half of the 2017/18 campaign, scoring one goal in 11 appearances. Martinez, now 21, is currently on a season-long loan back in the Spanish second tier at Rayo Majadahonda – he has scored one goal in seven appearances for his latest club.

Lucas Perez

Lucas Perez was born on 10th September 1988 in A Coruna, Galicia, Spain and began his career in Atletico Madrid’s youth system before moving to Rayo Vallecano. He joined Ukrainian club Karpaty Lviv in 2011 and also had a spell on loan at Dynamo Kiev, where he failed to make an appearance. He moved to Greek side PAOK in 2013 but joined Deportivo La Coruna on loan for the 2014/15 season. He made the move permanent in the summer of 2015 but was on the move again in August 2016, signing for Arsenal. After just a season at the Emirates, Perez returned to Deportivo La Coruna on loan for the 2017/18 campaign.

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Perez signed for Manuel Pellegrini’s West Ham for a reported fee of £4m in August this year. He made his Hammers debut as a substitute in a 2-1 home defeat to Bournemouth on 18th August this year. He has made six appearances to date for West Ham, scoring one goal in the 8-0 League Cup third round win over Macclesfield on 26th September 2018.


Dan Coker's Match Preview

Crossed Hammers & Three Lions: Frank Lampard Junior

Welcome to the latest in a series of articles designed for international weekends – a look back at former Hammers players who wore the Three Lions of England.

Today, as England prepare to face Croatia in the Nations League, we look back at a former Hammers and England midfielder. Frank Lampard Junior was born in Romford to West Ham left-back Frank Senior and Pat on the 20th June 1978, a month after the Hammers’ relegation from the top flight. He joined West Ham’s Academy in 1994, spent a spell on loan with Swansea in 1995 and won the South East Counties League in 1996, making the FA Youth Cup Final in the same year, although the Irons lost to Liverpool.

Lampard made his Hammers debut at the age of 17 on 31st January 1996 as a substitute in a 3-2 home win over Coventry; he made one further sub appearance in 1995/96 and made 16 appearances in 1996/97, although his season was ended by a broken leg suffered at Aston Villa in March 1997.

Lampard was a key figure in the Hammers’ ever-improving team in 1997/98, scoring his first goal for the club a minute after stepping off the bench on the opening day of the season, the winner in a 2-1 victory at Barnsley. Lampard made 42 appearances as the Hammers finished eighth, scoring nine goals, including a hat-trick in the League Cup fourth round against Walsall, who had future Hammer Jimmy Walker in goal. Lampard also scored the opener in a 3-1 defeat at Leeds’ Elland Road, replicating his dad’s jig round the corner flag at the same ground in the 1980 FA Cup semi-final by way of celebration. He made his debut for England Under-21s during this campaign, going on to captain the side.

Lampard made 41 appearances as the Hammers finished fifth in 1998/99, scoring six goals. Becoming renowned for spectacular strikes from distance, he notched long range strikes in home victories over Leicester and Middlesbrough, and also scored a penalty at Anfield’s Kop End in a 2-2 draw against Liverpool.

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Arguably Lampard’s best season in claret and blue was the 1999/2000 campaign, scoring 14 goals from midfield in 49 matches. He started the season in style, scoring four goals by the end of August – three in the InterToto Cup against Jokerit, Heerenveen and Metz, as well as the winner in a 1-0 home triumph against Tottenham. He also scored in the UEFA Cup against Osijek and bagged winners in Upton Park goalfests against Sheffield Wednesday (4-3) in November 1999 and Bradford in February 2000 (5-4). Lampard also made his full England debut under Kevin Keegan in October 1999, starting and playing 76 minutes in a 2-1 win over Belgium at Sunderland’s Stadium of Light – his cousin, Jamie Redknapp, scored the winning goal.

Lampard’s final campaign in east London, 2000/01, saw him bag nine goals in 37 games. He scored his only brace for the club in a 2-1 win at Bradford in February 2001 and signed off as a Hammer with three goals in his final four games. His last goal for the Irons was a penalty in a 2-1 defeat at Newcastle on 16th April 2001, with his final match for the club being a 2-0 home defeat to Leeds on 21st April 2001 – the visitors had 22-year-old Lampard’s youth team colleague Rio Ferdinand in their ranks. Lampard made his second and final England appearance while with the Hammers in Sven-Goran Eriksson’s first match in charge, as a half-time substitute in a 3-0 win over Spain at Villa Park in February 2001.

A few weeks later, Lampard’s father and uncle (Frank Senior and Harry Redknapp respectively) both left the club. Feeling that his position as a player at the club was untenable, Lampard sought a move and rejected Aston Villa to sign for Chelsea for £11m in the summer of 2001 – he had scored 38 goals in 187 appearances for West Ham United. My video below shows 37 of these 38 goals.

Lampard went on to become Chelsea’s highest goalscorer of all-time, scoring 211 goals in 648 appearances. He won three Premier League titles, four FA Cups, two League Cups, two Community Shields, one Champions League and one Europa League during his time in west London. He won 106 caps for England, scoring 29 goals for his country. He represented the Three Lions at the 2004 European Championships, and the 2006, 2010 and 2014 World Cups. He missed the 2012 Euros through a thigh injury.

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Lampard spent a season with Manchester City before ending his career at New York City FC in the United States. Lampard, now 40, is currently manager of Championship side Derby.

Croatia v England

England face Croatia this evening in the Nations League – it will be the ninth meeting between the two nations. The first competitive meeting between the pair resulted in a 4-2 win for the Three Lions in front of 57,047 at Lisbon’s Estadio da Luz on 21st June 2004, in their final Group B match of the 2004 European Championships. Britney Spears was number one with ‘Everytime’, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban topped the UK box office and Wimbledon were officially renamed as Milton Keynes Dons.

England were dealt an early blow when Hertha Berlin’s Niko Kovac gave Otto Baric’s Croatia the lead in the fifth minute. Sven-Goran Eriksson’s England equalised through Manchester United’s Paul Scholes five minutes before the interval before Everton wonderkid Wayne Rooney gave England the lead with a strike from distance right on half-time.

Rooney raced clear to make it 3-1 after 68 minutes but Juventus’ Igor Tudor pulled one back five minutes later. Former Hammer Frank Lampard Junior, the feature of today’s piece, wrapped up the win with 11 minutes left to make it 4-2. England would be knocked out by hosts Portugal in the quarter-finals.

Croatia: Tomislav Butina (Club Brugge), Josip Simunic (Hertha Berlin), Dario Simic (Milan), Boris Zivkovic (captain, Stuttgart), Robert Kovac (Bayern Munich), Igor Tudor (Juventus), Dovani Roso (Maccabi Haifa), Milan Rapaic (Ancona), Niko Kovac (Hertha Berlin), Tomislav Sokota (Benfica), Dado Prso (Monaco).

Subs: Ivica Mornar (Portsmouth) for Robert Kovac; Ivica Olic (CSKA Moscow) for Rapaic; Darijo Srna (Shakhtar Donetsk) for Simic.

England: David James (Man City), Gary Neville (Man Utd), Sol Campbell (Arsenal), John Terry (Chelsea), Ashley Cole (Arsenal), David Beckham (Real Madrid), Frank Lampard (Chelsea), Steven Gerrard (Liverpool), Paul Scholes (Man Utd), Michael Owen (Liverpool), Wayne Rooney (Everton).

Subs: Ledley King (Tottenham) for Scholes; Darius Vassell (Aston Villa) for Rooney; Phil Neville (Man Utd) for Lampard.

The previous articles in the series are:

Jack Tresadern
Ken Brown
Johnny ‘Budgie’ Byrne
Bobby Moore
Martin Peters
Sir Trevor Brooking
Alan Devonshire
Alvin Martin
Paul Goddard
Stuart Pearce
Joe Cole
David James
Robert Green


Dan Coker's Match Preview

West Ham's Croatian Connections: Part One

With England playing Croatia in the Nations League tomorrow, the first part of my look at West Ham’s Croatian Connections focuses on two former Hammers who also played for and managed their country.

Slaven Bilic

Slaven Bilic was born in Split on 11th September 1968 and began his professional career with Hajduk Split, making his first appearance for the club in the 1988/89 season, following loan spells with Primorac and Sibenik. After 109 appearances for Hajduk, the central defender moved to German club Karlsruhe in 1993 for a fee of £750,000. Bilic was soon appointed as the club’s captain and, in doing so, became the first-ever foreign player to be named club captain in Bundesliga history. He was voted the best centre-back in the Bundesliga after helping Karlsruhe reach the semi-final of the 1993/94 UEFA Cup.

Bilic, a law graduate fluent in German, English and Italian as well as his native Croatian, signed for Harry Redknapp’s West Ham United for £1.3m in January 1996. Due to a delay in the granting of his work permit, the 27-year-old had to wait a few weeks for his first start before making his debut in the 1-0 win over Tottenham at White Hart Lane on 12th February 1996, playing a part in Dani’s early winning goal. Bilic did not taste defeat in any of his first five matches as a Hammer as the club went on to beat Chelsea 2-1 at Stamford Bridge and defeat title hopefuls Newcastle 2-0 at the Boleyn Ground, before a 2-2 draw at Coventry and 2-0 home victory against Middlesbrough. Indeed Bilic would not be part of a losing Hammers team at home until September 1996 when Wimbledon triumphed 2-0 in east London. Bilic would also play every minute of Croatia’s run to the quarter-finals of Euro ’96, where they would be defeated by eventual winners Germany.

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Bilic’s first goal in claret and blue arrived on the 25th September 1996 in a 1-0 League Cup second-round second-leg encounter with Barnet at Upton Park, the Hammers going through 2-1 on aggregate. The classy, commanding defender scored his first Premier League goal just four days later but Liverpool went on to record a 2-1 win in east London. As the club became embroiled in a winter relegation scrap and were dumped out of the League Cup by lowly Stockport, ‘Super Slav’ set the side on the way to a crucial home win over fellow strugglers Sunderland, scoring the first goal in a 2-0 victory on 28th December 1996. It was to be his final goal in a West Ham shirt. Experiencing further cup embarrassment at the hands of Wrexham in the third round of the FA Cup, the signings of John Hartson, Paul Kitson and Steve Lomas ensured the Hammers’ Premier League survival – Bilic was named runner-up to Julian Dicks in the Hammer of the Year poll for 1996/97, signing off at Upton Park by keeping Alan Shearer quiet in a 0-0 draw with Newcastle. Bilic’s final game for West Ham came in a 2-0 defeat at Old Trafford against champions Manchester United on 11th May 1997.

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After three goals in 54 West Ham United appearances, Bilic signed for Everton in a £4.5m deal in the summer of 1997 – these three goals can be seen in my video below. The move had been agreed in March with then-Everton boss Joe Royle but Bilic claimed he had a debt of loyalty to West Ham to stay with the club until the end of the season to ensure the Hammers’ top-flight status was preserved. When he signed for Everton, the late Howard Kendall had taken over for a third spell with the Merseyside club.

Bilic impressed as Croatia reached the semi-finals of the 1998 World Cup in France; however, his exaggerated response to a raised hand by Laurent Blanc in the semi-final against the host nation ensured the French defender was sent off and consequently missed the final. Bilic went on to ensure Croatia finished third in the tournament. Bilic looked set for a return to West Ham in July 1999 as Harry Redknapp sought to reunite him with the ever-developing Rio Ferdinand but concerns about the Croatian’s long-term fitness, and doubts about securing insurance following his pelvic problems, scuppered the deal. Redknapp signed Bilic’s international team-mate Igor Stimac instead while Bilic remained in limbo for the next six months, until an agreement for a £1m pay-off was reached in February 2000, representing around half of the balance remaining on his Everton contract which still had just over two years to run. After 28 appearances for the Toffees, Bilic re-joined Hajduk Split 48 hours later, playing nine matches before announcing his retirement.

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Bilic, a rhythm guitarist in a Croatian rock band and self-proclaimed socialist, began his managerial career with Hajduk Split in 2001 and became coach of the Croatian Under-21 side in 2004. After two years he took over the reigns of the full Croatia side, enjoying a successful six-year spell which included knocking England out at the qualification stage for Euro 2008. He was appointed manager of Lokomotiv Moscow in 2012 where he spent a season before joining Besiktas.

After two years in Turkey, Bilic was announced as Sam Allardyce’s replacement at West Ham United. ‘Super Slav’ made an excellent start, defeating Arsenal, Liverpool and Manchester City away from home, making West Ham the first team to win at those three Premier League clubs in the same season for ten years, since Chelsea in 2005/06. The win at Anfield was the Hammers’ first there for 52 years – Bilic stated that “we parked the bus but we didn’t put the handbrake on”. Home wins over reigning champions Chelsea and Tottenham served to further endear Bilic to the Upton Park faithful before a 3-2 win over Manchester United in the final Boleyn match of all-time saw Super Slav in tears on the touchline at the final whistle. The Hammers finished seventh and reached the FA Cup quarter-finals, having knocked out Europa League finalists Liverpool along the way – it was the Hammers’ highest league finish for 14 years and the club’s first top-flight positive goal difference since 1985/86.

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Following the move to London Stadium, Slav led the Irons to another cup quarter-final and an 11th-placed finish, becoming the first manager in Hammers history to record top-11 finishes in his first two top-flight seasons. Slav’s Hammers beat Tottenham at Wembley in October 2017 to reach the last eight of the League Cup, the first time the club had reached Cup quarter-finals in three consecutive seasons since 1989-91. Slav and the club parted ways in November 2017 – now 50, he was part of ITV’s team at the 2018 World Cup and is currently manager of Al-Ittihad in the Saudi Professional League.

Igor Stimac

Igor Stimac was born in Metkovic on 6th September 1967 and began his professional career with Hajduk Split in the mid-1980s. He also had a loan spell at Dinamo Vinkovci. After 64 appearances for Hajduk, the central defender moved to Spanish club Cadiz in 1992.

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Stimac returned to Hajduk two years later before signing for Derby in October 1995 for £1.5m, helping the Rams to promotion to the Premier League in his first season. Stimac won 53 caps for Croatia, scoring two goals and appearing for his country at Euro ’96 and the 1998 World Cup.

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After four years in the east Midlands, Stimac joined West Ham in late August 1999 for £600,000. With the Hammers experiencing a defensive injury crisis, the 32-year-old made his debut in a 1-0 home win over Watford on 11th September 1999. Stimac scored his only goal for the Irons in a 2-2 draw at Newcastle on 3rd January 2000, a match which also saw him captain the team – this goal can be seen in my video below. He was sent off twice for the Hammers – once in a goalless home draw with Chelsea on 18th March 2000 and again in a 1-0 home defeat to Leicester on 23rd August 2000. His final appearance for the club came in a 3-0 home win over Southampton on 5th May 2001. Having made 52 appearances for West Ham, scoring one goal, Stimac returned to his home country for a third spell at Hajduk Split in the summer of 2001.

Stimac became manager of Hajduk Split in 2005 before becoming boss of fellow Croatian side Cibalia the following year. He was named manager of NK Zagreb in 2009, spending a year with the club. Stimac replaced Bilic as Croatia manager in 2012 but, a year later, he tendered his resignation to Davor Suker, his former West Ham and Croatia team-mate and president of the Croatian FA (more on Suker in Part 2).

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Stimac was named manager of Croatian club side Zadar in 2015 but quit after six months. He became head coach of Iranian club Sepahan in November 2015 but resigned in April 2016. Now 51, Stimac was most recently manager of Qatari club Al-Shahania, joining the side in 2016 before leaving the following year.


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